How to sing the works by Karol Szymanowski
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How to sing the works by Karol Szymanowski

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Published by PWM edition in Kraków .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Szymanowski, Karol -- Vocal music.,
  • Vocal muscis -- 20th century -- Interpretation (Phrasing, dynamics, etc.)

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementStanisława Korwin-Szymanowska ; (translated by Jerzy Zawadzki).
Classifications
LC ClassificationsML410.S99
The Physical Object
Pagination39 p., (12) p. of plates :
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17500700M

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KAROL SZYMANOWSKI Dr David C F Wright () Karol Maciej Korwin-Szymanowski was born at Tymoshovka in the Ukraine on 3 October To put him into historical context, he was born the year after the assassination of Tsar Alexander II by revolutionaries, and when, in the Sudan, Muhammed Ahmed claimed to be the Islamic saviour, the Madhi. "In this full-scale study of Karol Szymanowski's life and music, Alistair Wightman explores the composer's position as a constant outsider in his own country, yet a 'good European' in the ways in which he responded positively to a diverse range of musical talents, in particular Stravinsky, Strauss, Berg, Hindemith, Prokofiev and Ravel. The book throws light on Szymanowski‘s relationship to the Polish musical establishment, the reception of his works at home and abroad, his work as an educationalist, and the essentially European dimension of his art, drawing on letters, polemical writings, verse, theatrical sketches and the memoirs of family, friends and contemporaries. In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Notes () Book Review Polish Music History Series Szymanowski Karol Szymanowski: His Life and Works Grazyna Bacewicz.

Preludes for piano op. 1 – Three fragments from poems by Jan Kasprowicz op. 5 – Six Songs op. 2 – Four Etudes op. 4 – European history in the first half of the 20th century exercised a decisive influence on the life and work of Karol was born in Poland, a state carved up among several countries, in other words, he hailed from a nation that no longer existed on the map – something which resulted in the fact that he could fall back upon no infrastructure in the Western European sense of the word. Karol Maciej Szymanowski (Polish pronunciation: [ˌkarɔl ˌmat͡ɕɛj ʂɨmaˈnɔfskʲi]; 6 October – 29 March ) was a Polish composer and pianist, the most celebrated Polish composer of the early 20th century. He is considered a member of the late 19th-/early 20th-century modernist movement Young Poland and widely viewed as one of the greatest Polish composers. Works without Opus number. Prelude and Fugue in C sharp minor for Piano (/09) Lottery for Husbands or Fiancé No, Operetta in 3 Acts (/09) 3 Soldier's Songs for Voice and Piano () Sinuhaje are coming down singing, Song for Voice and Piano () Ceremonial March for .

The book throws light on Szymanowski's relationship to the Polish musical establishment, the reception of his works at home and abroad, his work as an educationalist, and the essentially European dimension of his art, drawing upon letters, polemical writings, verse, theatrical sketches and the memoirs of family, friends and contemporaries. Szymanowski Karol. Kurpian Songs, Op. 58 (XI) Szymanowski Karol. Songs of the Fairy Princess, Op. Szymanowski Karol. Sons of the Infatuated Muezzin, Op. Szymanowski Karol. Songs to Words by James Joyce, Op. 54 nos. Szymanowski Karol. Polish Songs (XIV) Szymanowski Karol. Siuhaje are coming down singing (XIII) Szymanowski Karol. In the spring of , Karol Szymanowski, together with his friend Stefan Spiess, spent nearly a month in North trip to Algeria and Tunisia awoke in Szymanowski a sincere interest in the Arab nations and Arab civilization. After returning to Tymoszówka by the “last normal train”, he began reading relevant volumes, jottings from which take up four notebooks held at the Polish.   Karol Szymanowski's early orientalism made his name – but his return to the music of his native Poland was an equal epiphany for him, writes Jim Samson.